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Nathaniel Williams, Ph.D.

Nate Williams, Social Work, Studio Portrait

Nathaniel Williams, Ph.D., LCSW

Assistant Professor
Education Building 711
natewilliams@boisestate.edu
(208) 426-3145
Office Hours
By appointment

Education

Ph.D., Social Work, Statistics (Minor), College of Social Work, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 2015

M.S.W., School of Social Work, Boise State University, 2004

B.A., Social Science (Psychology and Sociology), College of Social Science and Public Affairs, Boise State University, 2002

Areas of Research

Implementation Science
Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services
Organizational Culture and Climate
Organizational Implementation Strategies
Mechanisms of Change
Multilevel Modeling
Mediation and Moderation Analysis

Selected Publications

Peer Reviewed Journal Articles

Williams, N. J., Ehrhart, M. G., Aarons, G. A., Marcus, S. C., & Beidas, R. S. (2018). Linking molar organizational climate and strategic implementation climate to clinicians’ use of evidence-based psychotherapy techniques: Cross-sectional and lagged analyses from a two-year observational study. Implementation Science 13:85. doi: 10.1186/s13012-018-0781-2

Williams, N. J., Scott, L., & Aarons, G. A. (2018). Prevalence of serious emotional disturbance among US children: A meta-analysis. Psychiatric Services, 69, 32-40.

Beidas, R. S., Williams, N. J., Green, P. D., Aarons, G. A., Becker-Haimes, E., Evans, A. C., Rubin, R., Adams, D. R., & Marcus, S. C. (2017). Concordance between administrator and clinician ratings of organizational culture and climate. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research. doi: 10.1007/s10488-016-0776-8

Williams, N. J., Glisson, C., Hemmelgarn, A., & Green, P. (2017). Mechanisms of change in the ARC organizational strategy: Increasing mental health clinicians’ EBP adoption through improved organizational culture and capacity. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 44, 269-283

Williams, N. J. (2016). Assessing mental health clinicians’ intentions to adopt evidence-based treatments: Reliability and validity testing of the evidence-based treatment intentions scale. Implementation Science, 11(60). doi: 10.1186/s13012-016-0417-3

Glisson, C., Williams, N. J., Hemmelgarn, A., Proctor, E. K., & Green, P. (2016). Aligning organizational priorities with ARC to improve youth mental health service outcomes. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 84, 713-725.

Williams, N. J. (2016). Multilevel mechanisms of implementation strategies in mental health: Integrating theory, research, and practice. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 43, 783-798.

Glisson, C., Williams, N. J., Hemmelgarn, A., Proctor, E. K., & Green, P. (2016). Increasing clinicians’ EBT exploration and preparation behavior in youth mental health services by changing organizational culture with ARC. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 76, 40-46.

Glisson, C., & Williams, N. J. (2015). Assessing and changing organizational social contexts for effective mental health services. Annual Review of Public Health, 36, 507-523.

Williams, N. J., & Glisson, C. (2014). Testing a theory of organizational culture, climate and youth outcomes in child welfare systems: A United States national study. Child Abuse & Neglect, 38, 757-767.

Olin, S. S., Williams, N. J., Pollock, M., Armusewicz, K., Kutash, K., Glisson, C., & Hoagwood, K. E. (2014). Quality indicators for family support services and their relationship to organizational social context. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 41, 43-54.

Glisson, C., Williams, N. J., Green, P., Hemmelgarn, A., & Hoagwood, K. E. (2014). The organizational social context of mental health Medicaid waiver programs with family support services: Implications for research and practice. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 41, 32-42.

Williams, N. J., & Glisson, C. (2013). Reducing turnover is not enough: The need for proficient organizational cultures to support positive youth outcomes in child welfare. Children and Youth Services Review, 35, 1871-1877.

Glisson, C., Hemmelgarn, A., Green, P., & Williams, N. J. (2013). Randomized trial of the availability, responsiveness, and continuity (ARC) organizational intervention for improving youth outcomes in community mental health programs. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 52, 493-500.

Glisson, C., Hemmelgarn, A., Green, P., Dukes, D., Atkinson, S., & Williams, N. J. (2012). Randomized trial of the availability, responsiveness, and continuity (ARC) organizational intervention with community-based mental health programs and clinicians serving youth. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 51, 780-787.

Glisson, C., Green, P., & Williams, N. J. (2012). Assessing the organizational social context (OSC) of child welfare systems: Implications for research and practice. Child Abuse & Neglect, 36, 621-632.

Williams, N. J., & Beidas, R. S. (in press). The state of implementation science in child psychology and psychiatry: A review and suggestions to advance the field. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

Book Chapters

Williams, N. J., & Glisson, C. (in press). Changing organizational culture and climate to support evidence-based practice implementation: A conceptual and empirical review. In R. Mildon, B. Albers, & A. Shlonsky (Eds.), The Science of Implementation. New York: Springer.

Williams, N. J., & Glisson, C. (2014). The role of organizational culture and climate in the dissemination and implementation of empirically-supported treatments for youth. In R. Beidas, & P. Kendall (Eds.), Dissemination and Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices in Child and Adolescent Mental Health (pp. 61-81). New York: Oxford University Press.

Curriculum Vitae

Google Scholar Citations

CBT Radio podcast, featuring Dr. Williams’ research on the role of organizational culture in shaping therapists’ use of evidence-based practices

Research Spotlight