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Respiratory Care Faculty Elected to National Asthma Educator Certification Board

Samantha Davis

Samantha Davis

Samantha Davis, clinical assistant professor for the School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Respiratory Care, has been elected to be a board member for the National Asthma Educator Certification Board (NAECB) for the 2017-2019 term.

The NAECB is the national organization that creates and provides the examination to become a certified asthma educator, an expert in counseling individuals with asthma and their families on how to manage their asthma and minimize its impact on their quality of life. There are only 3,548 certified asthma educators worldwide.

NAECB’s mission is to promote optimal asthma management and quality of life among individuals with asthma, their families and communities by advancing excellence in asthma education through the Certified Asthma Educator process.

Davis has been involved with asthma management much of her career. She has previously served on the Board of Directors for the children’s asthma camp in Michigan, and as the Asthma Chair for the Michigan Society for Respiratory Care.

Davis earned an Associate of Applied Science in Respiratory Care and Bachelor of Health Services Administration from Baker College in Auburn Hills, Michigan. In 2014, she earned a Master of Science in Respiratory Care Leadership from Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts. Davis’ primary areas of interest include asthma management of underserved populations, neonatal/pediatric intensive care, and online education.

Respiratory Care Faculty and Students Present at AARC Congress 2016

Lutana Haan

Lutana Haan

Lutana Haan and Jody Lester, associate professors for the School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Respiratory Care, both gave individual presentations at the American Association for Respiratory Care (AARC) Congress 2016 on Oct. 15-18 in San Antonio, Texas.

Similarly, Samantha Davis, clinical assistant professor , Lonny Ashworth, director of RRT to bachelor’s degree completion program and professor, Ashlyn Krupa and VeAnn McFadden, students (all of the School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Respiratory Care), presented research at the AARC Congress. Additionally, 12 of the 17 Respiratory Care juniors were able to attend the conference.

Jody Lester

Jody Lester

Haan presented “Optimizing Patient Communication” which focused on specific strategies the audience could use to optimize their patient interactions to better educate their patients. She also presented “The Airway: Size and Shape Matter” which emphasized how the airway changes shape over time, as well as how sleep, obesity, and genetics affect optimal performance.

Lester presented “Sleeping on the Other Side of the Bed: Spousal Involvement in CPAP Adherence” which explained continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence by considering the perspectives of both the patient and their spouse. Evidence was discussed with emphasis on recommendations and implications for interventions to improve CPAP adherence. Lester also presented “Odds Are You Can Do This! Understanding the Results of Medical Studies” which used statistics from recently published medical studies to practice the interpretation of edds ratios, risk ratios, and absolute risk reduction, among other things. Last, Lester presented “Studying a Study – Using a Systematic Approach to Evaluate Medical Research” which introduced participants to the MAARIE framework – a step by step method for evaluating medical studies.

Samantha Davis

Samantha Davis

Davis, Ashworth, Krupa, and McFadden presented their research, “The Effect of Increasing Amplitude and Percent Support of Tidal Volume and Peak Pressure during Proportional Assist Ventilation.”

The students performed research by assessing a mode of mechanical ventilation, which is relatively new and not yet widely used, called Proportional Assist Ventilation (PAV+). This particular mode of ventilation is classified as a spontaneous mode, meaning the patient’s breaths are their own and not controlled exclusively by the ventilator. This mode of ventilation is often used as respiratory therapists attempt to wean patients off of the ventilator. In PAV+, the ventilator assesses the patient’s work-of-breathing and adjusts the support being provided by the ventilator proportionally to the patient’s respiratory efforts. In theory, if the patient has a strong respiratory effort then the ventilator will decrease the support it provides, but if a patient has a weak respiratory effort the ventilator will increase the support it provides. The students tested this theory using an electronic lung simulator and adjusted resistance and compliance which mimicked changes in patient effort. This study confirmed that during PAV+, the amount of support provided by the ventilator is proportional to patient effort.

Lonny Ashworth

Lonny Ashworth

Additionally, and with the help of AARC staff, Krupa’s boyfriend, Tyler Nelson, made a surprise visit to the Congress, climbed on the podium after the presentation, and asked Krupa to marry him. The AARC published a short article about the proposal in their Weekly Gazette, e-newsletter.

College of Health Sciences Faculty Publish in Health and Interprofessional Practice

Lutana Haan, associate professor and chair for the School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Respiratory Care, Rosemary Macy, associate professor for the School of Nursing, and Leslie Kendrick, associate professor and chair for the School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Radiologic Sciences and director of the Diagnostic Radiography Program, were accepted for publication in the Health and Interprofessional Practice volume one issue three.

Lutana Haan

Lutana Haan

The faculty’s manuscript, “Evolution of an Interprofessional Patient Skills Course with the Incorporation of Simulation Scenarios” was accepted for publication on May 19.

Interprofessional education is when students from one or more professions learn about, from, and with each other to enable effective collaboration and improve health outcomes. Interprofessional education allows students to bring their expertise in their discipline to the table and learn about other disciplines. It also offers students a chance to refine their soft skills, including communication, teamwork and problem solving.

The manuscript details a university level interprofessional patient skills course including nursing, radiologic sciences, and respiratory care students that has evolved over 20 years. The course includes a lecture and laboratory portion with specific content and skills focused on principles common to the three disciplines.

Leslie Kendrick

Leslie Kendrick

Students are placed in interprofessional groups during lab to practice and learn together. Each week, the students practice in a simulation scenario on the week’s content. This educational strategy has enhanced the students’ teamwork and communication skills and prepared them to apply these skills to clinical practice. Further research is needed to look at interprofessional education undergraduate healthcare course outcomes related to teamwork.

Interprofessional education is a natural fit in the simulation environment. Macy, Kendrick, and Haan’s skills lab requires students from all three of these clinical disciplines to interact with each other and learn common skills that their disciplines will use in the field.

Rosemary Macy

Rosemary Macy

In 2015, Macy, Kendrick, and Haan conducted the first large-scale interprofessional simulation where a full cohort from each discipline participated in two immersive simulations during a semester. The cohorts were broken into groups of approximately 10 students, with six nursing students and two students each from radiologic sciences and respiratory care. One nursing, one radiologic science, and one respiratory care student interacted with a manikin while the other seven students observed from the observation room. These types of experiences allow the students to understand what expertise each field brings to the table so that the students will be more likely to include those professions in their future practice.

“Interprofessional education is especially important because it prepares students to practice collaboratively in multidisciplinary teams,” said Joelle Powers, associate dean for the College of Health Sciences. “When they graduate, being able to provide high-quality team-based care will likely be a requirement of their jobs so we want students to have the interactive learning opportunities that will set them up to be successful.”

Balloons and Breathing – Boise State Researchers Explain the Connection

Lutana Haan, associate professor and chair, Jeff Anderson, associate professor and director of Clinical Education, and Grace Hofmann, 2015 graduate, all in the School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Respiratory Care, published an article in the October issue of Critical Care Nurse.

Lutana Haan

Lutana Haan

The article, titled “Esophageal Pressure Measurements in Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome,” explains how esophageal balloon catheters are used in the respiratory monitoring of critical care patients.

Esophageal balloon catheters are used to measure the pressure outside of the lung, in the space between the lung and the chest wall. When patients require very high pressures to breathe, it is often difficult to determine if the lungs are stiff or if there are high pressures outside the lungs. Putting in the esophageal balloon catheter allows separation of the pressure to ventilate the lung, versus pressure to “inflate the chest wall.” It is important not to use too high of a lung pressure in order to avoid lung damage, so the balloon helps to determine the cause of high pressure.

Jeff Anderson

Jeff Anderson

During expiration (breathing out) pressure is used to prevent lung collapse, but high pressure outside the lung may result in insufficient pressure to keep the lung open. Think of alveoli, tiny sacs within the lungs that allow oxygen and carbon dioxide to move between the lungs and bloodstream, like balloons. One could maintain pressure in a balloon to keep it from collapsing, but if it’s being squeezed from the outside there could be very little air in the balloon despite the pressure inside. Esophageal balloon pressure measurements also help respiratory care practitioners to select effective expiratory pressure levels.

The authors believe that the publication of this article will assist both critical care nurses and respiratory therapists to better understand the utility of lung pressure measurements being performed in some critically ill patients at Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center.

Haan holds a bachelor of science degree and a master of health science degree from Boise State. She is a registered respiratory therapist and a registered polysomnographic technician. Before coming to Boise State, Haan worked in sleep medicine primarily diagnosing obstructive sleep apnea in the pediatric through geriatric populations. Haan’s creativeness has involved her in several medical device innovation opportunities. She has collaborated with engineering students on the redesign of a crash cart that’s used in healthcare settings when advanced life support is needed.

Anderson has been a respiratory care practitioner since graduation from Madison Area Technical College in Madison, Wisconsin. After graduation he worked at the University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics for six years in the trauma and life support center, burn unit, cardiac surgery and medicine intensive care units, hematology, oncology, pediatrics, and pediatrics intensive care units. Anderson’s primary areas of interest include adult critical care, critical care monitoring, pulmonary function testing, and exercise physiology. He is also recognized as an effective teacher for diverse groups of students via his Physiology course and Medical Terminology and Cardiopulmonary Renal Anatomy course.

Hofmann graduated in the summer of 2015 with a bachelor of science in Respiratory Care. While at Boise State, Hoffman completed an internship at Massachusetts General Hospital, which resulted in her employment there as a respiratory care practitioner. She plans to attend medical school in the future.

Lonny Ashworth Continues to Promote Respiratory Care in Japan

Lonny Ashworth

Lonny Ashworth

This summer, Lonny Ashworth, professor for the School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Respiratory Care, spent six weeks in Japan presenting workshops, recruiting students and working on several research projects. He presented more than 20 workshops at 11 different hospitals throughout the country to more than 450 physicians, nurses, physical therapists and clinical engineers.

The Department of Respiratory Care has graduated several Japanese health care professionals, and will graduate another one next year. Of the 20 registered respiratory therapists in Japan, seven are graduates of Boise State. Several more Japanese health care professionals consulted with Ashworth about their intent to come to Boise State in the near future. Even though respiratory care is not yet a recognized profession in Japan, many healthcare professionals are working very hard to make this happen.

While in Japan, Ashworth worked with several physicians, nurses, physical therapists and clinical engineers on research projects. As a result, one manuscript has been submitted for publication and three more are in the process of data analysis or final write-up. It is anticipated that all three will be submitted for publication this fall.

The following is a list of workshops Ashworth presented this summer for the International Exchange Visit Programme for Respiratory Care Professionals.

  • Mechanical Ventilation of the Adult Patient: one-day workshop presented to co-medical personnel, Yokohama Municipal Citizen’s Hospital, Yokohama, Japan, June 2016
  • Mechanical Ventilation of the Adult Patient: one-day workshop presented to physicians and co-medical, Kurashiki Central Hospital, Okayama, Japan, July 2016
  • Mechanical Ventilation of the Adult Patient: one-day workshop presented to physicians and co-medical, KKR Takamatsu Hospital, Takamatsu, Japan, July 2016
  • Mechanical Ventilation of the Adult Patient: four, one-day workshops presented to co- medical, Kameda Medical Center, Kamogawa, Japan, July 2016
  • Mechanical Ventilation of the Adult Patient: two-day workshop presented to advanced nurses, Kameda Medical Center, Kamogawa, Japan, July 2016
  • Mechanical Ventilation of the Adult Patient: five, half-day workshops presented to physicians, Kameda Medical Center, Kamogawa, Japan, July 2016
  • Mechanical Ventilation of the Adult Patient: two-day workshop presented to physicians and co-medical, Shonan Respiratory Seminar, Fujisawa, Japan, July 2016
  • Mechanical Ventilation of the Adult Patient: one-day workshop presented to physicians, Teine Keijinkai Hospital, Sapporo, July 2016
  • Mechanical Ventilation of the Adult Patient: one-day workshop presented to co-medical, St. Luke’s International Hospital, Tokyo, Japan, July 2016
  • Mechanical Ventilation of the Adult Patient: one-day workshop presented to physicians, St. Luke’s International Hospital, Tokyo, Japan, July 2016
  • Mechanical Ventilation of the Adult Patient: one-day workshop presented to physicians and co-medical, Nippon Medical University Musashikosugi Hospital, Kawasaki, Japan, July 2016
  • Mechanical Ventilation of the Adult Patient: one-day workshop presented to physicians and co-medical staff, Kishiwada Tokusyukai Hospital, Osaka, Japan, July 2016
  • Mechanical Ventilation of the Adult Patient: one-day workshop presented to physicians and co-medical staff, Mie University, Mie, Japan, August 2016

Respiratory Care Faculty Quoted in Arbiter

Jeff Anderson

Jeff Anderson

Jeff Anderson, director of Clinical Education and associate professor for the School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Respiratory Care, was quoted in the August 30 Arbiter article, “Fire Season Rages On.”

The article details the wildfires that are currently active in Idaho and the potential impact they have on students’ ability to breathe. Because of the smoke, many students are experiencing respiratory problems while others remain unphased.

“The more exposure you have to it, the higher your risk of developing some respiratory complication. If you have asthma or some other type of lung disease, you step way up in terms of health effects from fire smoke,” said Anderson.

Read the story here.

Lonny Ashworth Receives 2016 Foundation Scholar Award

Lonny Ashworth

Lonny Ashworth

Lonny Ashworth, professor for the School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Respiratory Care, has received the 2016 Teaching Award. Ashworth was noted as “a role model for adult education who goes above and beyond the call of duty to facilitate student learning and makes himself available nights and weekends for students who need his help.”

John Ziker, professor and department chair of the College of Arts and Sciences Department of Anthropology, was awarded the 2016 Research and Creative Activity Award. Liljana Babinkostova, associate professor for the College of Arts and Sciences Department of Mathematics, was awarded the 2016 Service Award.

Read the full story here.

Lonny Ashworth Receives Toshihiko Koga, MD International Medal

Lonny Ashworth receiving the Toshihiko Koga, MD, International Achievement Medal

Lonny Ashworth receiving the Toshihiko Koga, MD, International Achievement Medal

Lonny Ashworth, professor in the School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Respiratory Care, received the International Council for Respiratory Care’s Toshihiko Koga, MD International Medal at the 2015 American Association of Respiratory Care International Congress in Tampa, Fla. on Nov. 7-10.

The Toshihiko Koga, MD International Medal is named in honor and memory of Toshihiko Koga, one of the founding members of the International Council for Respiratory Care and one of Ashworth’s friends and partners in the field of respiratory care.

Ashworth and Koga’s friendship and partnership began in 1994 when Koga was visiting Boise as part of a fellowship. Through their relationship, Ashworth began traveling to Japan in 1995 as part of the International Exchange Visit Programme for Respiratory Care Professionals to provide training in adult mechanical ventilation.

Since 1995, Ashworth has conducted more than 130 workshops in Japan on topics such as: use of graphic analysis during mechanical ventilation, pressure control ventilation, and withdrawal of ventilatory support. These workshops have benefitted several thousand physicians, nurses, physical therapists, and clinical engineers by increasing their knowledge base and establishing the use of protocols in Japan. Additionally, Ashworth has trained several of these individuals to provide similar workshops.

As a result of Ashworth’s work in Japan, six Japanese health care professionals have come to Boise State to become registered respiratory therapists and return to Japan with their bachelor’s degree to teach.

“Our department has had the benefit of Lonny’s expertise in the area of mechanical ventilation with his international work.  In Japan, he works alongside some of their top physicians and healthcare providers to grow the knowledge base of both parties. He has brought diversity back to our program in Boise, encouraging international students to join our program on campus. Our students have benefited from these experiences that they would not have had without the long-standing relationships Lonny has developed internationally,” said Lutana Haan, department chair and assistant professor in the School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Respiratory Care.

Lutana Haan Presents at 2015 Annual Idaho Sleep Professionals Association Meeting

Lutana Haan

Lutana Haan

Lutana Haan, assistant professor in the Department of Respiratory Care, spoke at the 2015 Annual Idaho Sleep Professionals Association Meeting on Oct. 4 in Hailey, Idaho.

Lutana presentation was titled, “Sleep and Obesity” and focused on the effect of hormones on both sleep and obesity, the effect of short duration on obesity, and the role of emotional stress.

The meeting was attended primarily by sleep technologists, physicians, and nurse practitioners in Idaho who work with individuals with sleep disorders.

The Idaho Sleep Professionals Association, formerly known as the Idaho Sleep Disorders Association, provides an ideal setting for healthcare professionals to discuss the hot topics related to sleep, and a forum to view new and existing products and services.

Two New Endowed Respiratory Care Scholarships Honor Influential Health Care Practitioners

Respiratory Care students will benefit from two new endowed scholarships: the Dr. Conrad Colby Respiratory Care Scholarship and the Thomas Raymond Gable Respiratory Care Scholarship.

The Dr. Conrad Colby Respiratory Care Scholarship was named in honor of Conrad Colby who began his tenure as program director and chair of Boise State’s Department of Respiratory Care in 1974. For the next 30 years, he provided leadership, vision, a strong commitment to academic excellence and student-focused education, and built the program into one of the best in the United States. Colby has a doctorate in biology from the University of Montana.

Colby believed strongly in community partnerships and the value of “giving back” in as many ways as possible. Colby also provided leadership to Boise State in his specialty of medical ethics. He believed that research was critical and endeavored to instill a love for research in faculty and students. One of Colby’s greatest achievements was his emphasis on student-focused education which created an educational climate in the Department of Respiratory Care where students knew that they were the faculty’s number one priority.

Because of Colby’s influence, the Department of Respiratory Care has continued to grow and remain one of the top respiratory care programs in the United States. This scholarship honors Colby, now professor emeritus, for all that he has given to the healthcare community in the Treasure Valley.

The Thomas Raymond Gable Respiratory Care Scholarship was named in honor of the late Tom Gable, a friend of the university who passed away in October 2014. Gable was a key pulmonary function technologist in the State of Idaho. During his career, he developed the Samuel Bloom Pulmonary Function Laboratory at St. Luke’s Regional Medical Center and taught the Pulmonary Function Lecture and Laboratory course to respiratory care students at Boise State for more than 40 years.

Gable was also very active in the state and national respiratory care societies. His team was retired after, for three years straight, winning the National Sputum Bowl Championship, a knowledge contest that is similar to the game show “Jeopardy” held during the American Association for Respiratory Care annual conference. Gable is frequently referred to by respiratory therapists and pulmonologists as “the smartest person they ever knew.” Gable’s love for learning and advancing respiratory care will never be forgotten. This scholarship honors his memory and keeps his name a part of the Department of Respiratory Care forever.

The two scholarships will each be awarded annually based on a four percent payout of the initial investment of $25,000 each. Recipients will be respiratory care students who have a GPA of 3.0 or higher and who are enrolled full time at Boise State. The Department of Respiratory Care resides in the School of Allied Health Sciences.

Jeff Anderson Shares Expertise with Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center Staff

Jeff Anderson

Jeff Anderson

Jeff Anderson, associate professor and director of clinical education in the Department of Respiratory Care, presented a two hour lecture on June 4th to nurses at Saint Alphonsus who are enrolled in a course titled Essentials of Critical Care Orientation (ECCO).

The ECCO course is for new intensive care unit nurses and covers a variety of respiratory care related topics including patient assessment, oxygen therapy, arterial blood gas and chest radiograph interpretation, and an introduction to mechanical ventilation.

Anderson also presented a one hour lecture on the interpretation of chest radiographs and computerized tomography (CT) scans for nurses on the medical response and code blue teams at Saint Alphonsus on Sept. 22. Medical response teams are made up primarily of registered nurses and respiratory therapists who are called to evaluate patients in distress, or who have had a sudden decrease in function. They may intervene and correct the situation, or transfer the patient to an area of the hospital in which they can receive higher level care such as an intensive care unit.

Faculty Promotes being a Director of Clinical Education as a Great Job

Jeff Anderson

Jeff Anderson

Jeff Anderson, associate professor and director of clinical education in the Department of Respiratory Care, was featured in an article with the American Association for Respiratory Care (AARC).

The purpose of Anderson’s article was to give advice for those exploring the idea of becoming a director of clinical education (DCE). In the interview, Anderson outlined the responsibilities he holds as a DCE which include generating the clinical schedules, identifying instructors for our sophomore students, and coordinating rotations as well as generating affiliation agreements. He explained that his experience at Gulf Coast Community College was invaluable in applying for the DCE position at Boise State and how generating the annual Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care reports gives him insight into how to add value to the clinical program. Anderson also revealed the biggest challenges and rewards he has experienced as a DCE and the advice he would give respiratory therapists seeking a position as a DCE. The entire article can be read here.
Anderson has been a respiratory care practitioner since graduating from Madison Area Technical College in Madison, Wisconsin. After graduation he worked at the University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics for six years in the trauma and life support center, burn unit, cardiac surgery and medicine intensive care units, hematology, oncology, pediatrics, and pediatrics intensive care units. His interest in exercise testing led him to complete a bachelor degree in exercise physiology from the University of Wisconsin. After graduation he joined the faculty of Gulf Coast Community College in Panama City, Florida for three years before joining the Boise State Respiratory Care faculty in 1986. Anderson has been the DCE for Boise State’s Respiratory Care over 28 years, which made him the perfect interview candidate for the AARC.