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Health Science Studies Students Awarded Idaho Health Information Management Association Credentialing Scholarship

Kayla Rigenhagen (left) and Hailey Poncia (right)

Kayla Rigenhagen (left) and Hailey Poncia (right)

Two Health Science Studies majors, Kayla Rigenhagen and Hailey Poncia, were awarded a credentialing scholarship from the Idaho Health Information Management Association (IdHIMA). The state association provides two to three scholarships per year to students and active members who are interested in sitting for a credentialing exam. The scholarship covers the fee for any American Health Information Management Association exam at the member rate.

Both students are Health Science Studies majors with an emphasis in Health Informatics and Information Management. Both students are interested in pursuing the Certified Coding Associate credential which will distinguish their competence in coding in any setting, a sought-after qualification by many facilities. Poncia will graduate in May 2016 and Rigenhagen will graduate in May 2017. The students will be taking the exam during summer 2016.

IdHIMA provides their members with access to professional education and networking among individuals within the health information management field and similar fields. IdHIMA is governed by a board which is elected by Idaho AHIMA credentialed members

Diagnostic Radiology Students Immensely Successful at Annual Conference

1st Place Poster: Sarah Johnston, Garrett Hanna, Amanda Francis

1st Place Poster: Sarah Johnston, Garrett Hanna, Amanda Francis

Five separate groups of Boise State diagnostic radiology students placed in the top three spots for both research papers and poster presentations at the Idaho Society of Radiologic Technologists (ISRT) annual conference in Twin Falls, Idaho on April 1 and 2. The students took home second and third place in the conference’s research paper competition, and swept the poster presentation competition.

Research paper competitors Tavia Saenz, Ashley Broad, and Daniel Johnson placed second place with their paper, “Protective Quality of Composite Lead Equivalents.” Ashley Barrett, Mar Parkinson, and Amber Sanford placed third with their paper, “Likelihood of Visualizing Glass Shards in X-rays.” A total of eight papers were accepted for the research paper competition.

In the poster exhibit competition, Amanda Francis, Garrett Hanna, and Sarah Johnston placed first for their research poster, “Cumulative Dose in NICU Patients.” Cassie Herd, Jason Thurston, and Chad Waddington placed second for their research poster, “Efficiency of Leaded Eyewear Between Standard C-Arm Positions.”  Anne Powell, Megan Tualaulelei, and Kimberly Forsythe placed third for their research poster, “Repeat/Reject Analysis in Computed Radiography.” A total of eight poster presentations were accepted for the research exhibit competition.

ISRT is a membership society for all professionals in medical imaging. They are an affiliate of the American Society of Radiologic Technologists, and work as advocates with others to promote quality patient care in Idaho. The annual conference is held each year for members to have an opportunity to share common goals and enhance their education.

  • Photo of the students who placed second for their poster presentation.
    2nd Place Poster

    Cassie Herd, Jason Thurston, Chad Waddington

  • Photo of the students who placed second for their research paper.
    2nd Place Paper

    Dan Johnson, Ashley Broad, Erica Wight (faculty adviser) and Tavia Saenz

  • Photo of the students who won third place for their poster presentation.
    3rd Place Poster

    Anne Powell, Kimberly Forsythe, Megan Tualaulelei

  • Photo of the students who won third place for their research paper.
    3rd Place Paper

    Amber Sanford, Mari Parkinson, Ashley Barrett, and Erica Wight (faculty adviser)

Center for Study of Aging Sponsors JAVA Summit to be Held in June

The 2016 Justice Alliance for Vulnerable Adults (JAVA) Summit on Elder Abuse and Exploitation will be held from 8 am to 5 pm on June 21 in the Boise State Student Union Building. The JAVA Summit is sponsored by the Center for the Study of Aging. Lunch is included and parking will be free in the Lincoln Garage.

The annual summit is a one day educational event that raises awareness and supports Idaho’s multidisciplinary efforts to prevent elder abuse and exploitation. This year’s summit theme is “Aging in Place: Safely, Securely and Independently.”  The keynote speaker will be Natalie Galucia, executive director of the Village To Village Network, a group designed to support new ‘villages’ (communities) that function to link neighbors together in order to help the elderly remain in their own homes as they grow older.

Online registration opened on April 22 at javaidaho.org. Registration before June 7 is $50 and registration after June 7 is $65.

For more information contact Mary Holden at maryholden@boisestate.edu or (208) 850-4771 or Donna Rogers at donna.rogers@brightstarcare.com or (208) 989-9241.

College of Health Sciences Holds Second Annual Interprofessional Research Conference

24The College of Health Sciences held its second annual Interprofessional Research Conference on April 11 in the Student Union. Fifteen student posters, representing the work of 29 student authors, were showcased.

Ron Pfeiffer, associate dean of the College of Health Sciences, gave a welcome address, celebrating the work of the student scholars.

“The College of Health Sciences has a bold mission to grow interprofessional education both within and outside the college,” said Pfeiffer. “Research and scholarship is a major part of the educational process. Many of the questions we are attempting to answer with research are extremely complex and require teams of researchers from multiple disciplines–this is the essence of interprofessional research.”

27The participating students and their faculty mentors represent all areas within the College of Health Sciences. The room was filled with people and posters and buzzed with discussions as students, faculty and staff interacted with the student researchers.

The following posters were presented:

  • “Protection Quality of Composite Lead Equivalents.” Ashley Broad, Daniel Johnson, and Tavia Saenz, Diagnostic Radiology majors. Faculty mentor: Leslie Kendrick, School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Radiologic Sciences.
  • “Effect of Energy Drinks on the Cardiovascular System: A Literature Review Employing a Formal Evidence Analysis Process.” Stephanie Davis, Health Science Studies major. Faculty Mentor: Tami Cirerol, School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Community and Environmental Health.
  • “Increasing Knowledge and Skills in Working with the Deaf Community.” Lisa Dayley, Master of Nursing program. Faculty mentor: Denise Seigart, School of Nursing.
  • “Narrowing the Wide Exposure Index Range.” Leanne Fleming, Jennifer Klaudt, and Emily Davenport, Diagnostic Radiology majors.  Faculty mentor: Leslie Kendrick, School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Radiologic Sciences.
  • “Cumulative Dose in NICU Patients.” Amanda Francis, Sarah Johnston and Garrett Hanna, Diagnostic Radiology majors.  Faculty mentor: Leslie Kendrick, School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Radiologic Sciences.
  • “Dose Differences in Lead Apron Thicknesses.” Jodie Higgins, Dorina Nitu, and Ashley Hayes, Diagnostic Radiology majors.  Faculty mentor: Leslie Kendrick, School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Radiologic Sciences.
  • “State Certification and Team Climate of Community Health Workers in Texas.” Brenna Kreglo, Nursing major. Faculty mentor: Mark Siemon, School of Nursing.
  • “Thermodynamic Characteristics of an Indian Sari.” Surabhi Malesha, Masters in Health Sciences – Health Promotion Emphasis program. Faculty mentor: Uwe Reischl, School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Community and Environmental Health.
  • “A Retrospective Analysis of the Rural Female Family Physician in Idaho.” Jessica Marshall, Health Science Studies major. Faculty mentor: Ed Baker, School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Community and Environmental Health.
  • “Imaging Glass Slivers.” Maricruz Parkinson, Amber Sanford, and Ashley Barrett, Diagnostic Radiology majors. Faculty mentor: Leslie Kendrick, School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Radiologic Sciences.
  • “Student Nurses Perceived Self-Confidence in Caring for Women with PPD Risk.” Ryoko Pentecost, Master of Nursing program. Faculty mentors: Shoni Davis and Mark Siemon, School of Nursing.
  • “Health Benefits to Treadmill Use During Radiologist Dictation.” Katie Price, Kristin LaRance, and Jessica Petty, Diagnostic Radiology majors.  Faculty mentor: Leslie Kendrick, School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Radiologic Sciences.
  • “Assessment of UV Radiation Penetration through Human Hair.” Destinie Triplett, Health Science Studies major. Faculty mentor: Uwe Reischl, School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Community and Environmental Health.
  • “Efficiency of Lead Eyewear Between Standard C-Arm Positions.” Chad Waddington, Jason Thurston, and Cassie Herd, Diagnostic Radiology majors.  Faculty mentor: Leslie Kendrick, School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Radiologic Sciences.
  • “Using Environmental Surrogates to Estimate Exposure to Diesel Particulate Matter (Total Carbon) in an Underground Metal Mine.” Emily Zamzow, Environmental and Occupational Health major. Faculty mentor: Dale Stephenson, School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Community and Environmental Health.

College of Health Sciences Hosts Retirement Celebration April 25

The College of Health Sciences invites the campus community to join in celebrating a well deserved retirement of four faculty who have provided a combined 90 years of service to the University..  The cake and beverage reception will be held from 3:30 to 5:00 p.m. on Monday, April 25,  in the Student Union Simplot B/D ballrooms.

Retirees include:

  • Shoni Davis, associate professor, School of Nursing, 11 years of service;
  • Marty Downey, associate professor, School of Nursing, 23 years of service;
  • Ron Pfeiffer, professor, associate dean, and executive director of the Center for Orthopaedic and Biomechanics Research, 37 years of service;
  • Vivian Schrader, professor and associate director of the RN-BS Completion Track, AGNP, and DNP programs,School of Nursing, 19 years of service.

Davis’s professional areas of specialty are mental health nursing, perinatal drug addiction, women’s behavioral health issues, and program implementation and evaluation. From 1985 through 2002, Davis developed, implemented and evaluated state funded residential and outpatient treatment programs for pregnant and parenting dual diagnosis (drug addicted and mental illness) women and their children in both California and Washington. During this period of time, her experiences included management of federally funded research demonstration grants; development, design and management of non-profit women and children centered treatment programs; consultation; and university teaching. Since becoming a faculty member at Boise State School of Nursing, Davis has conducted and published research in the area of enhancements to improve teaching, influencers of ethical decision making in nursing and most recently, the effectiveness of simulations as a teaching modality.

Downey’s teaching specialties are critical care nursing, medical-surgical nursing, health assessment, holistic nursing & health practices, stress management, and humor in health. Downey worked in critical care and was nationally certified in critical care nursing for over 20 years and now holds Alumnus CCRN status. She is equally proud of her certification as Advanced Holistic Nurse for over 15 years and her current status as Healing Touch Practitioner Apprentice at Level 4 of certificate training. Downey recently received her Certified Nurse Educator. Downey’s dissertation research focused on the education and use of complementary therapies such as massage, imagery, therapeutic or healing touch, acupuncture, aromatherapy (and others) by Idaho nurses in personal and professional practice. She promotes research in Healing Touch and other related therapies as a fellowship mentor for three research teams at St Luke’s Health System.

In addition to his administrative roles as associate dean for the College of Health Sciences and executive director of the Center for Orthopaedic and Biomechanics Research, Pfeiffer is a BOC Certified Athletic Trainer and a Licensed Athletic Trainer in the state of Idaho. Throughout his academic career, his research focus has been identifying gender related neuromechanical factors that may be contributing to non-contact injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament in female athletes. Pfeiffer continues to serve as a volunteer athletic trainer throughout the Treasure Valley. As associate dean, Pfeiffer has provided leadership for several college initiatives, including BroncoFit and interprofessional education.

Schrader helped create the highly successful RN-BS Completion Track, an online bachelor’s degree completion program for registered nurses with their associate’s degree. She now oversees this completion track and the AGNP Masters of Nursing and Certificate programs, and the Doctor in Nursing Practice program. Schrader’s career has encompassed all aspects of improving health care outcomes for patients and includes a focus in nursing education and leadership. She has been the co-investigator on several research projects over the years, most recently studying nursing practice ethics and moral distress which has expanded to the international arena. Schrader has been a Fulbright Senior Specialist since 2008. She is a member of Sigma Theta Tau, American Nurses Association and Idaho Nurses Association as well as a Certified Nurse Educator.

BroncoFit Week Hits Campus April 18-23

Health Services will host Boise State’s first BroncoFit week April 18-23, designed to help students, faculty and staff be more aware of all aspects of their health and take advantage of the wide variety of health-related programs and services Boise State has to offer. You can peruse the full schedule of BroncoFit week events here.

“There are many dimensions of wellness – social, financial, spiritual, emotional – we want people to realize that,” said Michelle Ihmels, director of Wellness Services. Themes like “Social Monday” and “Financial Tuesday” will help students, faculty and staff focus on the different facets of their wellbeing, such as financial planning or building a competitive LinkdIn profile. Ihmels said the goal is to get campus members to hone in on an aspect of their lives that they hope to improve and then commit to working on it.

“It could be an action step like sitting down and make a budget every month, or start bike commuting, or reaching out to family or friends to enrich your social health,” Ihmels explained. “Think of the difference that could make in someone’s life.”

“Our hope that students and faculty take away that BroncoFit isn’t just about physical fitness, it’s about being mentally happy and socially happy,” added Brittany Price, who helped organize the week’s events.

Still, both Price and Ihmels noted that physical wellbeing plays a large role in individual health. Fortunately, that aspect is covered, as well. On Saturday morning, the campus community is invited to take part in the popular Yoga on the Blue in Albertson’s Stadium and the Cycle Learning Center (CLC) is offering free demos on all rental bikes – including fat bikes, cruisers, road bikes, full suspension bikes and hardtails – for all Boise State students, faculty and staff, as well as the general public. Simply head to the CLC and sign out the bike of your choice, take it for a ride along the Boise Greenbelt or foothills and return it the same day. (The CLC is open from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more information on bike rentals, weekly rides and programs, visit the Cycle Learning Center website.

Radiologic Sciences Faculty Presents at Idaho Society of Radiologic Technologists Conference

Joie BurnsJoie Burns, Associate Professor for the School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Radiologic Sciences and Director of the Sonography Program, attended the Idaho Society of Radiologic Technologists annual conference in Twin Falls April 1-2. There, she presented two one-hour continuing education lectures on sonographic case studies of unusual pathology of the liver, superficial parts, obstetrics and gynecology.

Volunteers of All Fitness Levels Needed for Weight-Lifting Study

By: Cienna Madrid

The Department of Kinesiology is recruiting volunteers to participate in a research study designed to test the efficacy of a newly developed wrist-worn activity monitor in workouts.

“We have developed a method for identifying weight-lifting exercises using a wrist-worn activity monitor,” explained Scott Conger, an assistant professor for the School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Kinesiology. “Now, we need to test it during a normal workout.” He added that no weightlifting experience is necessary.

As most people are aware, resistance training is an important part of physical activity. But to be able to determine the health benefits of physical activity, we need to have accurate methods of objectively monitoring it. Conger explained that while we have 35 years of research on monitoring aerobic physical activity using accelerometer-based activity monitors, no studies have determined if resistance training exercises can be tracked using these same monitors. With the popularity of wrist-worn activity monitors (FitBit, Misfit, Jawbone, Fuelband, Apple Watch, etc.), being able to use these monitors to track all aspects of physical activity is important to determine the health benefits of exercise. Rather than using a commercially available monitor, Boise State’s research is using a research-grade monitor that will allow Conger’s team to access the raw data to generate their own prediction algorithms.

“Sometimes, these types of studies work well in a controlled lab setting but do not work as well during an unstructured workout,” Conger explained. “Our current study for which we are recruiting has two purposes. In part I, we are going to try to use some more sophisticated methods and additional data channels to improve on our prediction algorithms. We’ll have a research assistant demonstrate each exercise for the participants, then have the participant complete one set of 10 with a light weight. Part 2 is to test these algorithms during an ‘uncontrolled’ workout.”

For the study, Conger is recruiting men and women between 18-55 years old who are in good physical health and have no physical limitations when it comes to completing various dumbbell exercises (with light weights). The time commitment is one visit lasting 1-2 hours.

The study requirements include:

    • Part 1  Template exercises: complete one set of 10 reps of 12 different dumbbell exercises using 15 lbs or less.
    • Bench press, shoulder press, lateral raises, overhead triceps extensions, squats, standing bent over rows, kneeling bent over rows, upright rows, bicep curls, calf raises, walking lunges, triceps kickbacks.
    • Part 2 – Free-living workout: complete your normal workout while a researcher follows behind writing down everything that you do.
    • During your workout, include at least one set of at least 5 reps of each of the previous 12 dumbbell exercises.
    • Can complete as many sets/reps and with any resistance that you choose.
    • Can complete any additional exercises that you choose.

“While this may seem like a study for weight lifters, we are really looking for people with all ranges of weight-lifting experience,” Conger added. “For our prediction algorithms, the more variety that we have in the participants’ experience with weight lifting, the better. For people who are not regular exercisers, we will provide a list of different exercises that they can complete for their free-living workout.”

Conger’s goal is to recruit 150 participants for this study (and can test multiple people at a time, if you want to bring a buddy). For more information or to schedule a time to participate, send an email to physicalactivity@boisestate.edu.

School of Nursing Faculty Featured in Research in Holistic Nursing eNewsletter

Marty DowneyMarty Downey, associate professor in the School of Nursing, was featured in the January edition of the American Holistic Nurses Association’s (AHNA) ‘Research in Holistic Nursing’ eNewsletter.

Downey shared her expertise in the area of holistic nursing, nursing care designed to heal a patient as a ‘whole;’ her current research; how she began studying holistic nursing; her biggest challenges and joys in research; and where she sees the future of holistic nursing headed.

Downey described her most recent study on the use of holistic therapies for test anxiety in nursing students, which is in its second data collection analysis. She has also done research on the effects of aromatherapy on anxiety and nausea for breast cancer patients undergoing PORT- a cancer treatment where patients do not need to have needles put into their arms every time they receive treatment- in an outpatient setting as well as research on simulation and deliberate practice in emergency response training.

In the article, Downey said the most exciting thing about her research is data collection, result sharing, and publication. Downey hopes to motivate more undergraduate and graduate nursing students to promote safe, quality, effective holistic health care throughout the global community.

Downey’s specialties are critical care nursing, medical-surgical nursing, health assessment, holistic nursing and health practices, stress management, and humor in health. She has been Advanced Holistic Nurse certified for 16 years and completed her Certified Healing Touch Practitioner certificate in 2013.

TakePart Digital Magazine Highlights Community and Environmental Health Faculty

Cynthia Curl, Community and Environmental Health, Studio PortraitTakePart published an article highlighting Cynthia Curl, assistant professor for the School of Allied Health Sciences Department of Community and Environmental Health, and her research on the benefits of organic eating and the effects of pesticide consumption in children.

The article appeared on TakePart’s website on March 14. It detailed Curl’s 2003 research on pesticide consumption in children in Seattle, performed while she was earning her PhD  in environmental and occupations health sciences at the University of Washington.

In the article, Curl commented on how her 2003 research was groundbreaking. “Up until then people had thought there wasn’t really any difference between (eating) organic and conventional (food). […] This was the first study to show there was a measureable difference based on whether you had an organic or conventional diet.”

The article also highlighted Curl’s most recent research: measuring the effects of conventional and organic diets on expecting mothers and their children. Read the full article here.

Curl continues to research the effects of organic foods on the body. Read more about her research here.